Follow Us

simple, plant-based food with fresh ingredients, vegetables and heaps of grains

Creamy Seafood Chowder

In a famous scene from the movie Glengarry Glenross Al Pacino’s character, Ricky, talks about the insufferable heat in New York that day:

“They say it was so hot downtown this afternoon grown men on the street corner were going up to cops begging the cops to shoot them. They say you should not drink alcohol when it’s so hot.”

“Something I read. For they say it dehydrates you. They say you should drink water, but I subscribe to the law of contrary public opinion. If everyone thinks one thing, then I say bet the other way.”

And so, in the height of Iraqi summer, with 45 degrees Celsius outside, we decided to “bet against” and cook a hearty winter seafood chowder.

Chowder can be traced to the French coastal region of Brittany and the Cornwall area of England, separated by the English Channel. The origin of the term chowder probably comes from a mix of the French word “chaudière” meaning stew pot or cauldron, and the English word “jowter” meaning fish seller.

Chowder was first enjoyed by fishermen of these regions and originally made with whatever seafood was available, explaining the mix of a number of different types of fish in one dish and the many variations of chowder as it became popular in other areas of the world. It is known as a hearty winter dish, good to warm the bones after a long cold day on the rough seas.

Serves 8

Creamy Seafood Chowder

Chowder was first enjoyed by fishermen of these regions and originally made with whatever seafood was available, explaining the mix of a number of different types of fish in one dish and the many variations of chowder as it became popular in other areas of the world. It is known as a hearty winter dish, good to warm the bones after a long cold day on the rough seas.

20 minPrep Time

30 minCook Time

50 minTotal Time

Save RecipeSave Recipe

Ingredients

  • Two tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 50 g pancetta, diced
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 tsp sweet paprika; 1 tsp hot paprika
  • 1,200 ml fish stock
  • 700 g potatoes, cubed
  • 500 g salmon; 300 g white fish (skinned, boned and cut into bite-size cubes)
  • 200 g shrimp
  • 500 ml milk
  • 100 ml cream
  • Rustic brown bread, to serve

Instructions

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large pot and add: first the onion and after a minute the pancetta. Slowly sweat until the onion becomes translucent.
  2. Add the garlic and then paprika – stirring for a couple of minutes until the other ingredients are coated.
  3. Add the stock and potatoes and cover the pot. Bring to the boil and then immediately reduce to a steady simmer for a further 15 minutes.
  4. Add the milk & some salt and pepper
  5. Add the salmon and the white fish, covering and simmering for 10 minutes.
  6. Check for seasoning and add more salt/pepper if necessary.
  7. Gently stir in the cream and add the shrimp, leaving at the same heat for a further three minutes.
  8. Leave the pot sit, covered, for 5 minutes before serving with rustic brown bread.

Notes

Chowder can be even tastier the next day or even two days after cooking, but only if kept in the fridge and re-heated thoroughly! (reheat what you want to eat each time, don’t heat and cool the whole pot multiple times)

7.6.7
2
http://www.thecuisinecollective.com/creamy-seafood-chowder/

 

 


Related Posts

Botwinka: Polish beetroot-leaf-soup

Botwinka: Polish beetroot-leaf-soup

Last Saturday, Mike and I visited Nour al-Barakeh organic products bazaar to get some fresh veggies for the week ahead. It was my introduction to this weekend pop-up market which hosts organic farmers, food and natural cosmetics producers, local artisans and also some local chefs. […]

Superstitious Pasta with Shrimp

Superstitious Pasta with Shrimp

This July, I visited Lorenza in Rome. Early one morning, we set off to the oldest fishmonger in Ostiense: a neighborhood known for its street art and old industrial buildings. We were on a mission to stock up for that evening’s seafood dinner. It was a hot summer day filled with urban noise and a humid breeze from the Thyrrhenian Sea. The fish monger shop was straight out of a story book. It clearly hadn’t aged well and there were no windows inside.



Leave a Reply


%d bloggers like this: